Thursday, April 30, 2009

Gifted | What does it mean?

For the next few days (or until I run out of things to say), I am going to be addressing what it really means to be gifted. For the sake of clarification- we are talking about clinically gifted kiddoes.

We will get into some of the facts about gifted kids over the next few days, and I will show you charts and spout statistics and all that good stuff. . . But for today, I want you to see a simple observation chart.

There is a difference between kids who are bright and kids who are gifted. Bright kids are smart. And that is totally awesome. Gifted kids think differently. Their brains are biologically and neurologically different. I will hold back on the scientific mumbo jumbo, and ask you to look at the chart below. These are some of the differences between bright kiddoes and gifted kiddoes. . .


Do you see you child anywhere in here?


Bright Children Gifted Children
Knows the answers Asks the questions
Is interested Is highly curious
Is attentive Is mentally and physically involved
Has good ideas Has wild, silly ideas
Works hard Plays around, yet tests well
Answers the questions Discusses in detail, elaborates
Top group Beyond the group
Listens with interest Shows strong feelings and opinions
Learns with ease Already knows
6-8 repetitions for mastery 1-2 repetitions for mastery
Understands ideas Constructs abstractions
Enjoys peers Prefers adults
Grasps the meaning Draws inferences
Completes assignments Initiates projects
Is receptive Is intense
Copies accurately Creates a new design
Enjoys school Enjoys learning
Absorbs information Manipulates information
Technician Inventor
Good at memorization Good guesser
Enjoys straightforward Thrives on complexity
sequential presentation
Is alert Is keenly observant
Is pleased with learning Is highly self-critical

1 comment:

  1. What a great list! Thank you for sharing.

    Peace and laughter,
    Vicki

    ReplyDelete

I love to hear your feedback! This website is intended to be a welcoming and safe space for parents and advocates of the gifted. All wholesome and encouraging questions are invited, as well as questions or concerns relating to gifted topics.